Slave Zero
Genre Action -> Action
Today's Rank 10365
Homepage
USA
Date N/A
Publisher Atari
UK
Date 2001-06-29
Publisher Atari
Slave Zero takes place 500 years in the future, in a city run by the greedy and aggressive First Corporate Dynasty. Under the iron-fisted rule of the SovKhan, this dynasty has produced an army of giant biomechanical slaves, which will ensure the dynasty's reign over Megacity S1-9 indefinitely. Pitted against the Slaves are the Guardians, who have sworn to break the SovKhan's control. In order to defeat the first generation of massive Slaves, the Guardians have stolen the prototype, a 60-foot high battle Slave--Slave Zero. Like other Infogrames products, Slave Zero takes an incredibly long time to load up. It also runs slowly on some machines, even rigs that exceed the game specifications. At times, this results in a frustrating situation--you can't control Slave Zero with enough precision to survive bombardment by the enemy. Additionally, the game's designers have ignored the conventions of Slave Zero's film antecedents, films such as Godzilla and King Kong. In these movies, the monster is the biggest thing on screen. Slave Zero does not capitalise on the inherent power of this genre, where the title character is surrounded by infinitesimal but plucky foes; opponents who, despite the size difference, still manage to pose a credible threat. Instead, the buildings are enormous, and much of the opposition is as big as Slave Zero himself. The impact of playing a character who is 60 feet tall is thus diminished. This is too bad, because having a city of tiny civilians underfoot is a blast. Stomping buildings, cars, and people can offer a lot of satisfaction for players with a bloodthirsty streak. Tossing I-beams into enemy helicopters is purely fun. More of this kind of size-disparate action would have been appreciated. Even so, size isn't everything. Slave Zero has many assets: a good score, terrific graphics, and 13 three-part missions, each ending in a battle with a high-powered boss character. Some of these battles are brilliantly designed and provide nail-biting battles for combat junkies. --Alyx Dellamonica
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